Monday, April 2, 2007

My Thoughts on the Status of Quebec

The whole topic on Québec is a very sensitive one, but alas, I will start to tackle it today. As everyone who lives in Canada knows, Québec officially became a "nation" last fall in the eyes of Parliament. But what comes after that? Should Québec be bilingual, venture into full nationalism, or actually separate? I'm going to start from the last item on the list to the first.

Countries of North America: U.S., Canada, Québec?


There is obviously not too much for me to say on Québec separatism: I am against it. I think it would be one of the worst things to happen to Canada. And it wouldn't really benefit Québec, either. Yes, they would receive all tax dollars collected in Québec, but they would not have access to federal services; they would have to set up their Québec tax system with e-filing, etc. etc., which would cost money.

The Nationalism Argument


While I am not as extreme on this stance as Mario Dumont (ADQ leader), I do agree with the principles of Québec Nationalism. The culture and language of Québec is one of the most important features, in my opinion, of Canada. Resorting to Nationalism, to a certain extent, would protect that status. What I think Nationalism should encompass is the Québec and European traditions, and the French language itself. Québec is not just another province, but a society in itself. I will elaborate on my views on Nationalism at a later time.

Do you live in Quebec? Oui, j'y habite.


I cannot see bilingualism to be a good thing for Québec and its heritage. Once English is given an equal status in Québec, it will slowly and discreetly kill French as the main language in Québec. This is, in fact, completely the opposite direction that Québec should go.


So as you can see, there are many different options that Québec can choose. I do not feel whatsoever that Québec should be eaten up by North American culture and the English language. That is why I do not support separatism, yet, I feel that Québec should seek the Nation alternative.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

I totally agree.